This is the Revue!

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americasgreatoutdoors:

Blue sky day on the east side of Glacier yesterday.

Photo: National Park Service

Tagged with: #Montana #landscape #photography
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americasgreatoutdoors:

On a hot fourth of July weekend, the mist from Baring Falls cools! A short moderate jaunt from the Going-to-the-Sun-Road on the east side of Glacier National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

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americasgreatoutdoors:

Two Medicine Lake, East Glacier in Glacier National Park.

Tagged with: #Montana #landscape #flowers!
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americasgreatoutdoors:

Summer storms make for some amazing photos from America’s public lands. Clouds moved moved fast over the Flathead River in Glacier National Park last night.

Photo: National Park Service

Tagged with: #Montana #landscape #water #photography
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americasgreatoutdoors:

The last light of the day melts into the Flathead River in Glacier National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

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americasgreatoutdoors:

"If it isn’t God’s backyard, then he certainly lives nearby." - Robin Williams on Glacier National Park. RIP

Photo: Kim Hang Dessoliers

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americasgreatoutdoors:

St. Mary Lake — St. Mary Lake sits within the St. Mary Valley—”the eastern gateway to Glacier National Park. Prairies, mountains, and forests all converge in the valley to create a diverse and rich habitat for plants and animals. The open meadows surrounded by dense forests can afford some great opportunities for wildlife viewing.” 

Photo: Kim Keating, USGS

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americasgreatoutdoors:

Amazing sunset over Glacier National Park.

Photo: National Park Service

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americasgreatoutdoors:

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse at Sunset in Acadia National Park

Photo: Jeremy Stevens (www.sharetheexperience.org)

Tagged with: #Maine #landscape #water #photography
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americasgreatoutdoors:

Port Louisa National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa was established for the protection of migratory birds. It is located along the Mississippi River Flyway, one of the major routes for migrating waterfowl. Key goals of the refuge are to conserve and enhance the quality and diversity of fish and wildlife and their habitats; and to restore floodplain functions in the river corridor. 

Photo: Jessica Bolser, USFWS

Tagged with: #Iowa #water #landscape #photography
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geographilic:

Shoshone Falls, near Twin Falls, Idaho

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americasgreatoutdoors:

Gliding through mountains, canyons, meadows, and the vast farmlands of the Snake River plains, lined with commanding cottonwood galleries and a lush shrub understory, the Snake River Corridor is truly a beautiful and unique destination. The area offers diverse recreational opportunities with over 300,000 visits per year and sustains a broad variety of plant, fish, bird and wildlife populations. It is also home to the federally threatened Ute ladies’ tresses orchid and is a world-famous blue ribbon fishery, supporting the largest wild Yellowstone cutthroat trout population outside of Yellowstone National Park. The first World Fly Fishing Championship in North America was even hosted here in 1997. Thanks in part to the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) this area will continue to be preserved and enjoyed.  

Photo copyright: Leland Howard

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americasgreatoutdoors:

There is some excellent stargazing to be had in the Pole Creek Wilderness, Idaho.

Photo: Bob Wick

Tagged with: #Idaho #nightscape #space #photography
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americasgreatoutdoors:

The tallest dunes in North America are the centerpiece in a diverse landscape of grasslands, wetlands, conifer and aspen forests, alpine lakes, and tundra of Great Sand Dunes National Park in Colorado. Experience this diversity through hiking, sand sledding, splashing in Medano Creek, wildlife watching, and more!

Photo: Eric Magayne (www.sharetheexperience.org)

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weirdvintage:

The Mammoth Potato Hoax of Loveland, Colorado, 1894—Joseph B. Swan was a proud potato farmer who claimed to have grown a potato that was 13 pounds and 8 ounces.  W.L. Thorndyke, editor of the Loveland Reportercame up with an idea to help Swan promote his potatoes at an 1894 street fair. They created this trick photograph of a huge potato.  This may have become the first viral fake photograph, though it was soon declared to be fraudulent. (via)